A resume in verse

(You could do worse?)

When the job search seems to be so slow,
is resume in rhyme the way to go?

I’ve programmed java, python, xsl,
and maybe keywords are the easy sell,

but life is more than punching a keyboard:
I’ve taught, and gardened too, and found reward.

So: competent, at least, I’d hope a “yes”.
Perhaps a little flaky? Take your guess.

A sense of poetry? Quite clearly, “no”.
A work history can follow here below:

At ‘GBH, Archives and Library,
of over-complicated plans I was wary:

With designers and department staff,
made several solid sites without a gaff.

‘14 at the Harvard Herbaria:
Software to catalog all the flora.

‘11 to ‘13, an e-journal
called JoVE, with PHP and SQL.

It took a while, but paid a big a big tech debt,
and left it better than at the outset.

2010, and yet a season more:
was back at ITA for an encore.

2009, the library at Penn:
I long had planned to be librarian,

and this, though temporary, seemed a fit,
between the IT skills, and love of lit.

In xsl I crafted a display,
with java underneath to make it play.

At ITA, 2006 to 8,
on two projects did I participate:

The first: screen scraping for semantics, light.
Second, conventional, a travel site.

2005, a Lowell non-profit,
the CSL: I sys-adminned, a bit.

2004, and earlier, a run
of volunteering, internships. Was fun,

but hard to summarize: I’ll make a try
to fit it in, and not to go awry.

At Island Press: wrote up an export script.
(Had been by hand, and out of sync had slipped.)

Two farms, a monastery: floors to sweep,
gardens to weed, and herds of cows and sheep.

At Carter’s presidential library:
scanned papers so the data could be free.

Missoula, U of M: some book repair,
end papers, boxes, bindings, and that fare.

At College Park (a different U of M):
time teaching GIS, and tutoring them.

At NPR, the library’s ref desk:
I cataloged, and hunted down requests.

2005, an MLS from U
of Maryland. In ‘99, a few

years farther back, a math/geology
BA from Carleton was my first degree.

Of acronyms, there always is one more,
but fitting it in meter is the chore.